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Thread: Leeks vs. onions in soup

  1. #1
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    Default Leeks vs. onions in soup

    I am wondering if there is a difference in using 1 over the other, cut up in soup? Is one more mild than the other? I know leeks are pretty pricey now, but I have some on hand to use and wondered if they would be better for soup.

  2. #2
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    IMO leeks are very mild.
    Onions can be mild as well but IMO they tend are stronger in taste, depending on the variety.
    Use 'em, what do you have to lose? Why not use both?

  3. #3
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    I think leeks are milder also. But they are so very sandy and a pain to clean, so I don't use them very much. But I do have a great recipe for potato leek soup. It's a recipe from California Pizza Kitchen. Tastes so good.

  4. #4
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    Yummmm... Do share!!!!

    I have never used Leeks before. I once had a recipe that called for them but after pricing them? I went with scallions...
    Lauren ~The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people. ~
    Martin Luther King, Jr.

  5. #5
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    Leeks I think have a much different flavour than onions,,,more earthy tasting

  6. #6
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    Everything you ever wanted to know about leeks.

    Leeks
    Leeks (Allium porrum or A. ampeloprasum var. porrum), sometimes called "the gourmet's onion" are related to onions (A. cepa) and garlic (A. sativum), but have flat leaves instead of tubular and relatively little bulb development. They're easy to grow and delicious, with a taste all their own, very much like a mild onion. The thick leaf bases and slightly developed bulb look like a giant green onion, and are eaten as a cooked vegetable. Leeks are not as popular in the United States as they are in Europe, where they are known as "poor man's asparagus."

    The leek was developed from a wild type, which is native to Western Asia and the Mediterranean countries. Wild leeks were used as food during the early Bronze Age, around 4000 B.C., and were probably domesticated around 2000 B.C. They were part of the diet of those who built the Egyptian pyramids, and Hippocrates, the father of medicine, prescribed the leek as a cure for nosebleeds. Leeks have been cultivated in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and are particularly associated with Wales – dating back to 640 AD when Welsh soldiers wore pieces of leek in their helmets to distinguish themselves from their Saxon foes in battle. The Welsh traditionally wear a leek on St. David's Day (March 1) to commemorate King Cadawallader's victory over the Saxons that year. Leeks were brought to North America with early settlers from Europe. Today leeks are grown as an excellent substitute for onions and for its own unique mild onion flavor in soups and other dishes.

    This plant is a true perennial, even though it is generally referred to as a biennial. It multiplies by means of small lateral growths and often develops a roundish bulb at the base of the main growth. Leeks develop a broad, succulent stem rather than a large bulb like an onion. The plant has a fanlike sheaf of flat, blue-green or yellow-green leaves that may grow a foot or two in length, on a stalk up to 12 inches long. Types vary in the length and thickness of the leaf shanks (pseudo-stem).

    Some plants that are very similar to leeks include elephant (or great-headed) garlic (A. ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum), kurrat or Egyptian leek (A. kurrat) and wild leek (A. tricoccum). Elephant garlic produces very large bulbs that may weigh a pound or more, and is used as is garlic. The kurrat is grown around the Mediterranean and in the Middle East for its leaves, which can be harvested several times a year. Wild leeks, also called ramps, are native to North America and have a strong garlic-onion flavor.

    I will post the CPK soup recipe in T & T as soon as I have some more time.

  7. #7
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    The leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum (L.)) is a vegetable belonging, along with the onion and garlic, to the Alliaceae family. Also in this species are two very different vegetables: the elephant garlic (Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum), grown for its bulbs, and kurrat, which is grown in Egypt and elsewhere in the Middle East for its leaves. The leek is also sometimes classified as Allium porrum (L.).

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