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Thread: "Slug" Burgers

  1. #1
    belle Guest

    Default "Slug" Burgers

    I live in the south, where "slug" burgers are poplar. I know you can buy the meat at very few stores. What I would like to know, is what do you add to this slug burger meat to get that great taste. (These are also known as cereal burgers. Most poplar in TN. & MISS.)
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    So. California
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    Default

    [QUOTE=belle]I live in the south, where "slug" burgers are poplar. I know you can buy the meat at very few stores. What I would like to know, is what do you add to this slug burger meat to get that great taste. (These are also known as cereal burgers. Most poplar in TN. & MISS.)
    Thanks[/QUOTE]

    Please tell me this isn't really made from slugs!

  3. #3
    fatkat Guest

    Default

    About SLUGBURGERS:
    You'll find many references within these pages to slugburgers. For those who have not sampled this local delicacy featured in many local diners, do not be alarmed. Slugburgers are not made from the terrestrial gastropod mollusk of the same name. Locally, slugburgers have been overtly or covertly eaten for as long as most living Corinthians can remember. A slugburger is a burger made of a mixture of beef and some form of cheaper breading extender which is then deep-fat fried to a golden brown instead of grilled as a common hamburger. In earlier days, cornmeal was commonly used as an extender in slugburgers and animal fat was used for frying. In modern times, soybean meal has become the ingredient of choice which adds some protein value to the creation and vegetable oil is commonly used for frying. The standard garnish for a slugburger is mustard, pickle and an ample dose of onions. Good manners requires everyone to partake at the same time so that afterwards everyone's breath is equally offensive.

    The origin of the name is subject to some local debate and would be worthy of a PhD candidate's research and dissertation in etymology. For many years, slugburgers were commonly sold locally for 5 cents or a nickel. A slang expression for a nickel was a slug and hence the most common explanation for the origin of the name slugburger. Another use of the term slug derives from coins which were substitutes and may have related to slugburgers which were substitutes for real hamburgers. Yet another meaning of the term slug in the meat packing trade is for a dressed forequarter of lamb or mutton which could have possibly been used at some point in time in a meat mixture as an additional extender to the more expensive beef . If you are particularly sensitive to fried food or if you over-indulge in slugburgers, you may feel as if someone sl***ed you in the stomach and some residents believe this is the origin of the term slugburger. Finally, slugburgers should be served hot and eaten immediately. If they are not and particularly in the days when they were fried in lard, a cold slugburger could bear some visual resemblance to the garden pest and hence the name.

    From: THE GOURMAND'S GUIDE TO DINING IN AND AROUND CORINTH
    (C)1992, Milton Sandy, Jr.

  4. #4
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    Default

    ty fatkat ...I was thinking slugs not beef!!!!!

  5. #5
    fatkat Guest

    Default

    [QUOTE=wishingstar]ty fatkat ...I was thinking slugs not beef!!!!![/QUOTE]

    ME TOO - bleech

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Toronto, Canada
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    Default

    Sorry - I couldn't find a recipe but I did find this online

    You'll find many references within these pages to slugburgers. For those who have not sampled this local delicacy featured in many local diners, do not be alarmed. Slugburgers are not made from the terrestrial gastropod mollusk of the same name. Locally, slugburgers have been overtly or covertly eaten for as long as most living Corinthians can remember. A slugburger is a burger made of a mixture of beef and some form of cheaper breading extender which is then deep-fat fried to a golden brown instead of grilled as a common hamburger. In earlier days, cornmeal was commonly used as an extender in slugburgers and animal fat was used for frying. In modern times, soybean meal has become the ingredient of choice which adds some protein value to the creation and vegetable oil is commonly used for frying. The standard garnish for a slugburger is mustard, pickle and an ample dose of onions. Good manners requires everyone to partake at the same time so that afterwards everyone's breath is equally offensive.

    The origin of the name is subject to some local debate and would be worthy of a PhD candidate's research and dissertation in etymology. For many years, slugburgers were commonly sold locally for 5 cents or a nickel. A slang expression for a nickel was a slug and hence the most common explanation for the origin of the name slugburger. Another use of the term slug derives from coins which were substitutes and may have related to slugburgers which were substitutes for real hamburgers. Yet another meaning of the term slug in the meat packing trade is for a dressed forequarter of lamb or mutton which could have possibly been used at some point in time in a meat mixture as an additional extender to the more expensive beef . If you are particularly sensitive to fried food or if you over-indulge in slugburgers, you may feel as if someone sl***ed you in the stomach and some residents believe this is the origin of the term slugburger. Finally, slugburgers should be served hot and eaten immediately. If they are not and particularly in the days when they were fried in lard, a cold slugburger could bear some visual resemblance to the garden pest and hence the name.



    Potato flakes were used as an extender then, soybean grits are now used.


    Here's another bit of contradictory info

    Eating slugburgers is a matter of preference, not of practicality. You either love them or hate them. In fact, some people actually crave them. Don't worry, slugburgers are not made from terrestrial gastropods, commonly called slugs. Today, the beef mixture for the slugburger is made into small patties, which are fried once in hot grease, then frozen until needed. They are then fried once again when the slugburger is ordered. Because they are small, about the size of a cookie, people order two or three dozen at a time. They are traditionally served topped with mustard, dill pickles, and onions on a small-sized hamburger bun.

    These burgers get their name from the slang term for a nickel used during the 1930s and 1940s. For many years, slugburgers sold for a nickel each.

    During the Great Depression and World War II, beef was scare, and rationing resulted in some pretty weird recipes. To make ground beef go further, fillers such as cereal, potatoes, flour, cornmeal, soybeans, and onions were added.

    Corinth, Mississippi, seems to be the birthplace of these hamburgers. In Corinth, slugburgers are still very popular, with an annual Slugburger Festival held every year. Also, if you say hamburger, you get hamburger. The only time you will be asked to specify between "slug" and "beef" is if you just order a "burger." To actually get a traditional hamburger, you must specify a "beef burger."

  7. #7
    yaya78006 Guest

    Default

    Slimey, Gooey, Slippery, Slugs!

    Y'all had me worried too!

  8. #8
    yaya78006 Guest

    Default

    Are they like the sliders at white castle?

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default

    This is all I could find.

    A typical slugburger is a patty made of ground beef and a cheaper "extender," like cornmeal or soybean meal. The patty is deep-fried, then served on a bun with mustard, pickles and lots o onions.

  10. #10
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    Default

    I live in Mississippi, and I've never heard of slug burgers.

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