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the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

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  • the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

    so special, or tasty, it is a lot of work to get it done..anyone made this sauce before?

  • #2
    Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

    Food network new show called Secrets of a Restaurant Chef made bolognese sauce. They will probably rerun it again or go to Food network.com and see if you can find her receipe. It took her 4hrs to make.

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    • #3
      Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

      I think its probably the milk! Heres a Tyler Florence recipe I made once...

      2 ounces dried porcini mushrooms, wiped of grit
      2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
      1/4 pound pancetta or slab bacon, finely chopped
      1 medium onion, finely chopped
      2 celery stalks, finely chopped
      2 carrots, finely chopped
      5 garlic cloves, minced
      4 fresh thyme sprigs, leaves stripped from the stem
      2 fresh oregano sprigs, leaves stripped from the stem
      1 fresh rosemary sprig, needles stripped from the stem
      2 bay leaves
      1 pound ground pork
      1 pound ground beef
      1 cup milk
      1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, hand-crushed
      2 cups dry red wine
      Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
      1 pound dry tagiatelle pasta
      1 handful fresh basil, hand-torn, for garnish
      Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, for serving

      Reconstitute the mushrooms in boiling water for 20 minutes until tender, drain and coarsely chop.
      In a large heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium flame. Add the pancetta and saute for 2 minutes to render out the fat. Add the porcinis, onion, celery, carrots, and garlic; stirring to combine. Toss in the thyme, oregano, rosemary, and bay leaves. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring, until the vegetables are very tender but not browned.

      Raise the heat a bit and add the ground pork and beef; brown until the meat is no longer pink, breaking up the clumps with a wooden spoon. Add the milk and simmer until the liquid is evaporated, about 10 minutes. Carefully pour in the tomatoes and wine; season with salt and pepper. Bring the sauce to a boil, then lower the heat and cover. Slowly simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring now and then, until the sauce is very thick. Taste again for salt and pepper.

      When you are ready to serve, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, add the pasta and cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until tender yet firm (as they say in Italian "al dente.") Drain the pasta well and toss with the Bolognese sauce. Shower with basil and pass grated cheese around the table.

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      • #4
        Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

        I was going to guess the wine. I've never tried milk in it before.

        I usually like most of Tyler Florence's recipes... but it drives me batty when he puts MORE EVOO on top of everything!!
        "What fresh hell is this?" Dorothy Parker

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        • #5
          Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

          i guess what i meant was, anyone here made this sauce before, and how does it taste, compard to regular ragu?

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          • #6
            Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

            It's a really thick meat sauce w/ intense flavor... I love it.
            "What fresh hell is this?" Dorothy Parker

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            • #7
              Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

              It is simmered very slowly. It has a richer, heavier taste than ragu. I usually start with a ragu-type sauce, add an extra can of diced tomatoes, a cup or so of red wine, and simmer for a couple of hours. As the sauce thickens, I add more wine. I think there was a saying--a cup of wine for the pot and a cup for the cook, but I found that this cook often ended up in her cups before the pot was done cooking.
              Communicate. It can't make things any worse!

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              • #8
                Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                I have made this sauce before, but I have never ever added milk ??

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                • #9
                  Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                  The milk just softens up the ground meat.

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                  • #10
                    Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                    Tastebud, that sounds like a fun one to make, I'll be doing it this weekend for sure.. Thanks for the post.

                    I'm surprised it instructs to dump out the water from soaking the dried mushrooms, there's so much flavor in it! My Polish ancestors would cringe, lol.. But maybe in this sauce it would totally throw the flavor off..

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                    • #11
                      Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                      Originally posted by Ginger View Post
                      It is simmered very slowly. It has a richer, heavier taste than ragu. I usually start with a ragu-type sauce, add an extra can of diced tomatoes, a cup or so of red wine, and simmer for a couple of hours. As the sauce thickens, I add more wine. I think there was a saying--a cup of wine for the pot and a cup for the cook, but I found that this cook often ended up in her cups before the pot was done cooking.
                      Similar to what I do Ginger! I start with a couple of jars of Prego. Then, I add petite diced tomatoes, couple of minced garlic cloves, red pepper flakes, 1/2 cup of Merlot, dash of brown sugar, can of tomato sauce, fresh parmesan, and some Parsley flakes.......

                      The Prego or Ragu give the sauce a really good head start in the flavor area.. Just gotta add a few things to make it better...

                      Oh, and the longer it can simmer, the better!
                      Lauren ~The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people. ~
                      Martin Luther King, Jr.

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                      • #12
                        Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                        Absolutely right Lauren. But I have to add that, I use high quality beef if I want to make a meat sauce--leaning towards extra lean and frying SLOWLY until no pink shows, draining and RINSING under hot water to really get all that extra fat out. I have also started to add about a teaspoon of sugar to the tomatoes and no extra salt because canned tomatoes already have that added. Some people add about a tablespoon of olive oil but I really don't think it is necessary.

                        Something else to try, is saute the minced veggies (onion, garlic, celery and carrot) in wine instead of oil or broth. Much more flavour in my opinion.
                        Communicate. It can't make things any worse!

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                        • #13
                          Re: the flavor of bolognese....what makes it

                          Here's the recipe that was on that new FNWork program - Secrets of a Restaurant Chef. Looked delicious and very easy.

                          Pasta Bolognese Recipe courtesy Anne Burrell
                          Show: Secrets of a Restaurant Chef
                          Episode: The Secret to Pasta Bolognese





                          1 large onion or 2 small, cut into 1-inch dice
                          2 large carrots, cut into 1/2-inch dice
                          3 ribs celery, cut into 1-inch dice
                          4 cloves garlic
                          Extra-virgin olive oil, for the pan
                          Kosher salt
                          3 pounds ground chuck, brisket or round or combination
                          2 cups tomato paste
                          3 cups hearty red wine
                          Water
                          3 bay leaves
                          1 bunch thyme, tied in a bundle
                          1 pound spaghetti
                          1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
                          High quality extra-virgin olive oil, for finishing

                          In a food processor, puree onion, carrots, celery, and garlic into a coarse paste. In a large pan over medium heat, coat pan with oil. Add the pureed veggies and season generously with salt. Bring the pan to a medium-high heat and cook until all the water has evaporated and they become nice and brown, stirring frequently, about 15 to 20 minutes. Be patient, this is where the big flavors develop.
                          Add the ground beef and season again generously with salt. BROWN THE BEEF! Brown food tastes good. Don't rush this step. Cook another 15 to 20 minutes.

                          Add the tomato paste and cook until brown about 4 to 5 minutes. Add the red wine. Cook until the wine has reduced by half, another 4 to 5 minutes.

                          Add water to the pan until the water is about 1 inch above the meat. Toss in the bay leaves and the bundle of thyme and stir to combine everything. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer, stirring occasionally. As the water evaporates you will gradually need to add more, about 2 to 3 cups at a time. Don't be shy about adding water during the cooking process, you can always cook it out. This is a game of reduce and add more water. This is where big rich flavors develop. If you try to add all the water in the beginning you will have boiled meat sauce rather than a rich, thick meaty sauce. Stir and TASTE frequently. Season with salt, if needed (you probably will). Simmer for 3 1/2 to 4 hours.

                          During the last 30 minutes of cooking, bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat to cook the spaghetti. Pasta water should ALWAYS be well salted. Salty as the ocean! TASTE IT! If your pasta water is under seasoned it doesn't matter how good your sauce is, your complete dish will always taste under seasoned. When the water is at a rolling boil add the spaghetti and cook for 1 minute less than it calls for on the package. Reserve 1/2 cup of the pasta cooking water.

                          While the pasta is cooking remove 1/2 of the ragu from the pot and reserve.

                          Drain the pasta and add to the pot with the remaining ragu. Stir or toss the pasta to coat with the sauce. Add some of the reserved sauce, if needed, to make it about an even ratio between pasta and sauce. Add the reserved pasta cooking water and cook the pasta and sauce together over a medium heat until the water has reduced. Turn off the heat and give a big sprinkle of Parmigiano and a generous drizzle of the high quality finishing olive oil. Toss or stir vigorously. Divide the pasta and sauce into serving bowls or 1 big pasta bowl. Top with remaining grated Parmigiano. Serve immediately.

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