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  • Chutney

    Anybody out there know the history & usages for chutney. I am curious. I have never used it & I picked some up and it is sweet and VERY spicy. Any suggestions? I think it may be a condiment to use in Indian Dishes.....Hmmmm?
    Have you made time to listen to the birds today........

  • #2
    Re: Chutney

    I don't know the history, but I am sure it is easily looked up. Chutney is like a salsa. You can use it on top of fish, meat, chicken. It is served with our meals at the local Indian rest. I do know that some chutneys are sweeter, some are really spicy. It is a mix of fruit or vegetables. I have some at home that is really good spread on hearty crusty toast and cheese. So I guess it can be like a jam also. That's about all I know.
    A man of words and not of deeds, is like a garden full of weeds.

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    • #3
      Re: Chutney

      Hunebe is right. Chutney is a condiment. It can be sweet, almost like a jam (although it usually has things like fruit, raisins, onion, tart apple and some vinegar in it) and would then be used to moderate the 'heat' in spicy food. but it can also be quite hot to add flavour to bland food.

      British folk also serve chutney with a 'plowman's lunch'--cheese, bread, pickles, and the like.

      I make my own peach chutney which is wonderful with bbq chicken and curry, and tomato chutney, which I usually serve with roast beef or meat pie.
      Communicate. It can't make things any worse!

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      • #4
        Re: Chutney

        Chutney is similar in consistency to jelly, salsa or relish, and is used as a sweet and sour condiment. Usually made fresh, chutney contains fruit and sugar to give it a sweet taste, and almost all chutney contains vinegar and perhaps onions to give it a corresponding sour flavor. The ingredients are mixed together and then simmered slowly. While chutney is primarily sweet and sour, there can also be many variations of spices, often giving it a hot and spicy flavor.

        Originating in India, chutney was imported from India to Western Europe in the 17th century. European reproductions of chutney were often called "mangoed" fruits and vegetables, as one of the most common fruits used in the making of chutney is the mango. The word chutney is derived from the East Indian word Chatni. The Hindi word for "to crush" literally means "to make chutney." This signifies the process by which chutney is made; often the ingredients are crushed together with a stone.

        Like jams and jellies, chutney can be chunky or smooth. In India, spicy chutney is usually served with curry and often with cold meats and vegetables. Sweet chutney is a pleasant addition to bread or crackers and cheese, and can serve as a snack or small meal.

        Some of the more popular ingredients for chutney, in addition to mangoes, are limes, apples, peaches, plums, apricots, tomatoes, lemons and even coconuts. Additional spices may include cloves, garlic, cilantro, mustard, cinnamon, ginger, cayenne pepper, jalapenos, tamarind and mint. Chutney is so diverse that it can be made with only a few of these ingredients or several, to make a variety of flavors and styles.

        Chutney is usually eaten fresh in its native India, but as chutney has been westernized, like many things, it is mass-produced and can be bought in nearly any supermarket in the western world. In the United States and Britain, offering chutney as a condiment is becoming nearly as popular as jam, relish and even ketchup. Chutney can be served at a formal dinner as a condiment for a fancy meal, or at a casual picnic with tortilla chips or crackers. Whatever the occasion, chutney is a tasty, sweet and sour treat that is sure to please.

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        • #5
          Re: Chutney

          Thank-you so much for the information! It is gratly appreciated!
          Have you made time to listen to the birds today........

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