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  • Capers

    What exactly are they? I think I was told once upon a time, but I forget, and what do they taste like? They are very salty??? I've seen quite a few recipes lately that call for them and was wondering if you could omit them if wanted?
    A balanced diet is a cookie in both hands

  • #2
    Capers of commerce are immature flower buds which have been pickled in vinegar or preserved in granular salt. Semi-mature fruits (caperberries) and young shoots with small leaves may also be pickled for use as a condiment.

    Capers have a sharp piquant flavor and add pungency, a peculiar aroma and saltiness to comestibles such as pasta sauces, pizza, fish, meats and salads. The flavor of caper may be described as being similar to that of mustard and black pepper. In fact, the caper strong flavor comes from mustard oil: methyl isothiocyanate (released from glucocapparin molecules) arising from crushed plant tissues .

    Capers make an important contribution to the pantheon of classic Mediterranean flavors that include: olives, rucola (argula, or garden rocket), anchovies and artichokes.
    Hope this info helps. I love capers and use them in tuna salads, potato salads, crab cakes , I flavor sauces with them, lots of different uses.

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    • #3
      YUM! I/we LOVE capers!
      I planted some bird seed. A bird came up. Now I don't know what to feed it.

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      • #4
        A Caper (Capparis spinosa) is a shrub from the Mediterranean region. It is best known for its edible buds and fruit which are usually consumed pickled.

        Culinary uses

        The pickled or salted caper bud (also called caper) is often used as a seasoning or garnish. Capers are a common ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine. The grown fruit of the caper shrub is also available, prepared similarly to the buds, as caper berries.

        The berries, when ready to pick, are a dark olive green and about the size of a kernel of maize. They are picked and then pickled in a vinegar and salt solution.

        Capers are often enjoyed in cold smoked salmon or cured salmon dishes, salad, pizza, pasta and sauces. Capers are also sometimes substituted for olives to garnish a martini.

        The caper was used in ancient Greece as a carminative. The caper-berry is mentioned in the Bible in the book of Ecclesiastes as "avionah" according to modern interpretation of the word.

        Here's a picture of the caper plant, I just hope it work's
        Last edited by Rescuedpanther; 06-10-2006, 04:20 PM.

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        • #5
          capers

          I find that if they are left to cook in the dish they can get kinda strong and rancid tasting. I prefer to add them a few minutes before serving.

          Colleen



          Originally posted by MudderBear
          What exactly are they? I think I was told once upon a time, but I forget, and what do they taste like? They are very salty??? I've seen quite a few recipes lately that call for them and was wondering if you could omit them if wanted?

          Comment

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