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I was just reading about 10 foods that will last almost forever...

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  • I was just reading about 10 foods that will last almost forever...

    Do you know what they are? I'll tell you so you don't throw away these items if they have worked their way into the back of your pantry:

    # 1 White rice. Providing it's kept in an airtight container, you can safely keep it for 30 years or more. Brown rice contains some rice oil so it should be used within 6 months.

    # 2 Pure honey and only pure honey and it needs to be well sealed. Some of the honey sold in supermarkets is blended with other sweeteners. There was a jar of honey found in an Egyptian tomb that was 5,500 years old and was still edible.

    # 3 Pure salt, mainly because it's a mineral. If it's pure salt it will keep literally forever, however if it has added pepper, herbs, spices only keep it for 2 years. If salt is kept in an open pig (container for salt) it may be splashed with other liquids in the kitchen so it's best to only keep a small amount in an open container. If you buy iodised/iodized salt, it only keeps for 5 years.

    # 4 Soy sauce will keep for many years unopened. Even after it's been opened, store it in the fridge with a good sealing lid and you'll get to use it down to the last drop. The high salt content doesn't allow anything to live in it. I have some reduced salt soy sauce and I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

    # 5 Sugar... all kinds of sugar providing it's pure. Some icing sugars have cornflour added to stop lumps from forming. Even brown sugar that can harden so much that it takes a lot of effort to chip a piece off can be used. All you need to do is heat it in the microwave and give it a stir. Keep it all airtight (loving my Tupperware at this point) and it will last for decades.

    # 6 Dried beans... may lose some of their shiny appearance, however they won't hurt you to eat them inside 30 or so years. Again, airtight storage is the key.

    # 7 Pure Maple Syrup... this one was of interest to me because a lady I met on CopyKat gave me a bottle of pure maple syrup over 10 years ago and I was wondering about it. Unopened it will keep forever. Once it is open, if it does form a mold floating on the surface, just remove the mold by pouring it through a fine sieve and heating it slightly before pouring it back into a clear bottle.

    # 8 Powdered milk... this one annoyed me because I buy powdered milk to add to my bread making. The packet says to discard the contents after six weeks. I couldn't get my head around why it was safe in the airtight foil bag in which it was packed but not safe when I moved it into an airtight container. My research tells me otherwise. It keeps for a long, long time. It was invented so that long term storage of powdered milk could be used for years. Full cream powdered milk kept in airtight containers will keep for around 10-15 years. Non-fat powdered milk will last upward of 25 years.

    # 9 Hard liquor (but not creamed liqueurs) will keep forever, however if you have hard liquor in your pantry, it's kinda wasted just sitting there. I have some that my Dad had brought home from my 21st birthday party. It's not open but even if it was, it would still be ok. We don't drink and I wouldn't open it anyway... or maybe I would at one of the grandchildren's 21 birthday.


    #10 A disappointment is a packet of soft dates that are vacuum sealed and for intents and purposes, look perfect through the plastic vaccum bag. The dates are happily soaked in sugar syrup even to this day. The advice for dates are to open and taste them. If they taste bad, chuck them. If they taste good, eat them. I found my dates in my Mum's pantry at her house. She would have purchased them to make date scones and then forgot they were there. I like to look at them occasionally and I'll keep them sealed until deterioration is obvious.


    Another food that will last a long time is a meat called Pemmican. I had never heard of it before. It's prepared by drying meat from big game animals like elk or buffalo, which was ground into a powder and mixed with berries and rendered fat. It can be eaten raw or cooked and invented by Native American tribes. Not really expecting to find it in my supermarket, I searched the word Pemmican and it came up with a garden ornament in the shape of a pelican... *LOL* Has anyone heard of it and even tasted it?


    Hopefully these suggestions might save someone from replacing your sugar, salt or honey because they are past their "best before" date. These days producers have to imprint the packaging with a date and I'm sure they are hopeful that people will toss out that full packet of cooking salt because it's 6 months out of date. With the powdered milk, it takes me about 5 months to use all of the 2kg packet that I purchase and I'm definitely not going to chuck it after six weeks.

    I never thought the comment, "I wouldn't touch him/her with a 6' pole"
    would become a National policy, but here we are...

  • #2
    Pemmican is awful, I got some at a market once, even the dog wouldn't eat it. Imagine jerky ground up with applesauce and lard and ground nuts. It's a survival food because you would have to be starving to eat it!

    You can ferment lots of things in honey. I make honey fermented garlic and fermented jalapenos. You basically just put them in a jar and cover with honey. You turn it everyday to make sure everything is coated and burp the jars. I smear the garlic on bread ​​​​​and use the flavored honey for cooking or cough syrup.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by muzette7 View Post
      Pemmican is awful, I got some at a market once, even the dog wouldn't eat it. Imagine jerky ground up with applesauce and lard and ground nuts. It's a survival food because you would have to be starving to eat it!

      You can ferment lots of things in honey. I make honey fermented garlic and fermented jalapenos. You basically just put them in a jar and cover with honey. You turn it everyday to make sure everything is coated and burp the jars. I smear the garlic on bread ​​​​​and use the flavored honey for cooking or cough syrup.
      Sounds like it's just packed with protein without thinking about taste. Disgusting... however people say that about Vegemite and we love it. Native Americans may just laugh off people who don't like it much like Australians do with Vegemite. I think that Kangaroo is a terrible taste but others enjoy it. To me it's like eating dog food.

      That's interesting about fermenting food with honey. I'll have to give that some serious thought... thanks
      I never thought the comment, "I wouldn't touch him/her with a 6' pole"
      would become a National policy, but here we are...

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