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Vera's photos of the Winter Tea, 2022

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  • Vera's photos of the Winter Tea, 2022

    https://i.imgur.com/up1Tv4V.jpg

    Photo from Vera
    Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

    Napoleon Hill

  • #2
    https://i.imgur.com/69N28ES.jpg

    Photo from Vera
    Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

    Napoleon Hill

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    • #3
      Beautiful!

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      • #4
        Beautiful table setting , Vera
        food looks delicious
        You did a great job

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        • #5
          I want to eat those cucumber sandwiches right now! Nothing fresher than cucumber on bread
          Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

          Napoleon Hill

          Comment


          • #6
            Vera... I just noticed the cup of tea on the right right of the picture. Maybe someone has started drinking it, but my guess is that's how much tea you put in the cups. I can hear my Granddad's voice saying "the tide's out on this cuppa tea!" meaning he wanted it filled up... *LOL*
            Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

            Napoleon Hill

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            • #7
              Thank you all. I had two triple trays plus soup that doesn't show and an Italian meatball in a metal cup that doesn't show. The amuse bouche is on the spoon on the plate. I also made tea cakes (pineapple/banana) for everyone to take home. I am the chair of the Hospitality Committee for our small neighborhood. I guess I am taking it very seriously - lol. I am already thinking about a spring get together that includes the husbands - maybe a Spring Re-leaf??

              Chayote - I got a chuckle out of what your Granddad said when he needed a refill. The trays were the last thing to come out of the kitchen so that cup of tea you saw had already been started. The tea was something I had never had or made before. It was called a Winter Tea and had little snowflakes with the tea leaves. When the tea was steeped and finished the snowflakes were gone. It must have been a flavor enhancer of some sort.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Vera View Post
                Chayote - I got a chuckle out of what your Granddad said when he needed a refill. The trays were the last thing to come out of the kitchen so that cup of tea you saw had already been started. The tea was something I had never had or made before. It was called a Winter Tea and had little snowflakes with the tea leaves. When the tea was steeped and finished the snowflakes were gone. It must have been a flavor enhancer of some sort.
                When I visited a friend in Texas, I noticed that almost everyone I met drank iced tea. I'd never seen iced tea before then. Once day when I asked for a cup of tea in a cafe, the waitress asked me if I meant iced tea. Is it really that uncommon to drink hot tea in the US?
                Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

                Napoleon Hill

                Comment


                • #9
                  the blue candles look amazing, Vera. I just noticed that they were sitting in water. I'm looking forward to being settled in the house so I can go back to burning candles. I have some nice smelling candles in little glass votives.
                  Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

                  Napoleon Hill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chayote View Post

                    When I visited a friend in Texas, I noticed that almost everyone I met drank iced tea. I'd never seen iced tea before then. Once day when I asked for a cup of tea in a cafe, the waitress asked me if I meant iced tea. Is it really that uncommon to drink hot tea in the US?
                    I don't know about the rest of the US, but ice tea is the drink of choice for most of Texas , south Texas especially. But it is not uncommon for people to drink hot tea. They will bring you a pot with hot water and tea bags, not a problem . Grocery stores have a wide variety of different brands of tea bags, don't know about lose tea leaves ?? I am not a tea drinker and mostly just have water to drink, except in the morning, I love my coffee.

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                    • #11
                      I am not an iced tea drinker, but I like hot tea. The sealed bag that I purchased had 16 teaspoons of loose tea inside. Loose tea usually comes in metal tins but this was an aluminum bag and I had to measure it so I knew how much boiling water to add (8 oz per cup) and then it is steeped for only five minutes and magic happened. Black tea needs 212 degrees of boiling water, but other teas need different temperatures - who knew? I had a large loose tea holder that had micro small holes in it so no tea leaves could escape. I made a gallon (128 oz) of hot tea.

                      Chayote - Yes, the candles float in water. As it burns down, the candles rise to the top. I wanted to add pomegranate seeds to float around the candle top for color, but they were out of season. The devil is in the details. I love those candle holders. Got them at Crate and Barrel years ago.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sabine View Post
                        I don't know about the rest of the US, but ice tea is the drink of choice for most of Texas , south Texas especially. But it is not uncommon for people to drink hot tea. They will bring you a pot with hot water and tea bags, not a problem . Grocery stores have a wide variety of different brands of tea bags, don't know about lose tea leaves ?? I am not a tea drinker and mostly just have water to drink, except in the morning, I love my coffee.
                        I drink coffee now but growing up I didn't know what coffee was. When my eldest sister was a teacher at a small country school, she came home to visit during school holidays. I do remember the ripple of disapproval from my mother and grandmother to the fact that my sister brought a tin of coffee with her. I mean, they treated her like it was an illegal drug... *LOL* I clearly remember my grandmother asking her what was wrong with tea! Coffee wasn't seen in the stores until Italian and Greek migrants came in the 1960s. These days I think it's a 50/50 split between tea and coffee, although it's more likely elderly people who would ask for tea.

                        I grew up loving very sweet tea. My dad used to put two teaspoons of sugar in his black tea but not stir it and he would only drink the top half. I remember climbing up to sit on his knee and drink the sugary tea from the bottom of his cup... Happy memories.
                        Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

                        Napoleon Hill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Vera View Post
                          I am not an iced tea drinker, but I like hot tea. The sealed bag that I purchased had 16 teaspoons of loose tea inside. Loose tea usually comes in metal tins but this was an aluminum bag and I had to measure it so I knew how much boiling water to add (8 oz per cup) and then it is steeped for only five minutes and magic happened. Black tea needs 212 degrees of boiling water, but other teas need different temperatures - who knew? I had a large loose tea holder that had micro small holes in it so no tea leaves could escape. I made a gallon (128 oz) of hot tea.

                          Chayote - Yes, the candles float in water. As it burns down, the candles rise to the top. I wanted to add pomegranate seeds to float around the candle top for color, but they were out of season. The devil is in the details. I love those candle holders. Got them at Crate and Barrel years ago.
                          My Grandma taught us to put one spoonful of tea leaves for each person plus one for the pot. She never tested the heat of the water but tradition was that after the water went into the teapot, lid was put on and then the teapot turned around three times before pouring. I don't know that turning the pot did anything but they always did it... They had a metal tea strainer that rested over the top of the teacup and poured the tea through the strainer similar to this one:

                          https://i.pinimg.com/originals/fe/f9/ff/fef9ff2bcd46de69e18695f109a418fd.jpg
                          Effort only fully releases its rewards after a person refuses to quit.

                          Napoleon Hill

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                          • #14
                            Vera, your display is just charming!

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